Using Comic Books to Support Writing

allkindsofmindsAffinities, Differentiated Instruction, Differentiated Learning, Learning, Reading, Writing

Super heroes are all around us. In the movies, on TV, on T-shirts, on lunch boxes, and of course in comic books.  While you may think of the stereotypical comic book character from the Simpsons, these visual narratives can offer young readers a new approach to learning. On this episode of the Mind Matters Show, Dr. Craig Pohlman talks to … Read More

(Re)Defining Dyslexia

allkindsofmindsDifferentiated Learning, Learning, Metacognition, Spatial Ordering, Student Strengths, Student Weaknesses, Writing

In a recent New York Times op-ed, Defining My Dyslexia, physician and author Blake Charlton explores some of the emerging research and trends related to dyslexia while also sharing his own story about his struggles growing up a dyslexic. At the heart of his piece is the growing understanding that along with the challenges associated with dyslexia, are a collection … Read More

Summer Blog Series Post #7: The Role of Graphomotor Function in Handwriting

Kim CarterDifferentiated Learning, Graphomotor Function, Handwriting, Learning, Learning Challenges, Strategies for teachers, Teacher Effectiveness, Uncategorized, Writing

In last week’s post, we discussed the demands of revising written work.  Today, we’re going to focus on a different aspect of writing: handwriting. Many people, adults and children alike, struggle with penmanship.  The ability to use computers to convey ideas can help minimize the need for handwriting and relieve handwriting-challenged individuals from the frustration of writing in some cases.  … Read More

Summer Blog Series Post #6: The Role of Higher Order Cognition in Revising Written Work

Kim CarterDifferentiated Learning, Higher Order Thinking, Learning, Learning Challenges, Strategies for teachers, Teacher Effectiveness, Teachers, Writing

Adding content and new ideas to a story, essay, or report can be difficult, but it is also very important. Students may stop at the end of a sentence, reread what they have written, and decide there is a better word to express what they want to say. They may find places where they need to add more description or … Read More