Using Validation to Help Regulate Emotions

allkindsofmindsLearning about Learning, Learning Specialists, Nonverbal thinking, Social Emotional Learning, Whole Child

This post by Sara Caitlyn Deal was originally posted on Southeast Psych’s blog.  Have you ever said something mean when you were angry that you later regretted? Or sent an email when you were really upset that later you wished was never sent? We have all done these things but communicating when overwhelmed with emotion does not usually work well. … Read More

The Mind Matters Show: Study Tip — The Format Shift

Kim CarterAffinities, Classroom Culture, Language, Learning Challenges, Learning Specialists, Student Strengths, Student Weaknesses

Here is the latest video from Dr. Craig Pohlman’s “The Mind Matters Show.” Ben Berg describes the video on this blog post as such, When it comes to studying for a test, some methods give you a better chance for success. On this episode of the Mind Matters Show, Dr. Craig Pohlman explains the difference between active and passive studying … Read More

Paradox of Students’ “Deficits” As Society’s Strengths

allkindsofmindsAffinities, Classroom Culture, Differentiated Learning, Learning Challenges, Research, Social Cognition, Social Emotional Learning, Student Strengths, Student Weaknesses, Whole Child

The Economist article, “In praise of misfits,” lays out the business-related benefits of what the author  calls “creatives,” “anti-social geeks,” “oddball quants,” and “rule-breaking entrepreneurs.” While the entire article is well worth the read, we have pulled out a few quotes to help frame the idea that we should work tirelessly to help our school system to support these “misfits.” … Read More

John Cleese Explains the Brain

allkindsofmindsBrain Facts, Classroom Culture, Language, Learning Challenges

Below is a video from John Cleese’s very “informative” brain podcast (actual content begins around 35 seconds). You’ll notice, of course, that nearly every sentence is almost entirely gibberish. It is humorous to us in large part because . . . John Cleese is a masterful humorist who can make gobbledygook sound sensical, and . . . It is a low stakes … Read More

How the Brain Retains (Infographic)

allkindsofmindsBrain Facts, Differentiated Learning, Learning about Learning, Memory

The folks over at mindflash developed this infographic about how and where the brain stores it’s information. While much of the brain’s information storage system remains a mystery, it is important to remember (see what we did there?) that memory is varied, nuanced, and often associative. Working memory is different than short or long term memory and what students take … Read More

Humor — It’s all in your head

allkindsofmindsBrain Facts, Higher Order Thinking

Humor is generally regarded as an important and valuable tool for sustaining engagement with students (in moderation, of course). But what is really going on in the brain when it comes to humor? In an article in New Scientist magazine, Daniel Elkan writes, Yet humour is a far more complex process than primeval pleasures like sex or food. In addition to … Read More

The Mysterious Workings of the Adolescent Brain

allkindsofmindsBrain Facts, Higher Order Thinking, Student Strengths, Student Weaknesses

There is a common thread that connects the earliest parents to the current ones. It isn’t walking to school uphill in snow both ways, negotiating screen time, or bedtime battles. At some point or another we have all thought the same thing about our kids: “What in the world were they thinking?!” While neuroscience still has a long way to … Read More

Minds at Work, Unpacked

allkindsofmindsClassroom Culture, Differentiated Learning, Learning about Learning, School Culture

An All Kinds of Mind’s School of Distinction, St. Andrew’s Episcopal in Potomac, Maryland discovered their top to bottom attention to research-based practices necessitated founding an institution dedicated to exploring the meeting ground between neuroscience research and educational practices. Their Center for Transformational Teaching and Learning was created with four key questions in mind: 1. What is learning? 2.Where does learning happen? … Read More